Audience Segmenation

Audience SegmenationPaper instructions:Adhere to the Assignment?s Instructions. APA format required . scholarly references.Assignment 1: Discussion?Audience SegmentationSuccessful health promotion and communication campaigns rarely use a one-size-fits-all approach. Audience segmentation can help public health professionals and policy makers create campaigns focused on specific audiences or target groups. Segmentation can be based on demographic characteristics or on attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. In this assignment, you will identify appropriate strategies for audience segmentation for targeting health communication campaigns.Respond to the following:?Identify the most important characteristics that should be taken into consideration when segmenting audiences or targeting messages for certain populations.?Identify other factors, besides these characteristics, that need to be considered in audience segmentation.?Describe the various steps in the process of making decisions about audience segmentation. Be sure to consider the following: ?The extent of the health issue in the audience?The audience?s health literacy?The size and diversity of the audience?The availability of communication channels to reach the audience?Message content considerations, such as languageSupport your statements with examples and scholarly references.Write your initial response in 1?2 paragraphs. Apply APA standards to citation of sources.__________________________________________________________________There are several important points you must consider to understand your target audience. The following are some of the most significant points:?The nature, incidence, and prevalence of the illness or health issue within the target audience must be understood. This is often a complex issue. Illnesses are often combined into a general category such as ?cancer? when, in fact, there are many types of cancers. Similarly, ?alcoholism? is a lay term that encompasses college student binge drinking and senior citizen over-use of alcohol with prescription medication.?Effective health education has to be targeted to a homogeneous audience to achieve an impact. Communication campaigns that attempt to address diverse audiences are too unfocused to be effective and squander resources.?Recipients of the health message have personal attributes that affect how they view illness and behavior change. Age, gender, culture, ethnicity, social relationships, and personality patterns are some examples of the heterogeneity of an audience. Selection of communication channels and messages requires planning to encompass the relevant characteristics of the intended audience and may result in different ?sub-messages? for different subgroups. These subgroups are what the social marketing field defines as ?segments.??People have different definitions of health and these definitions should be assessed as part of the audience definition. Do they consider health to be the absence of disease, a state of well-being, assurance of functioning, or physical attractiveness? Knowing these ?personal motivators? helps in crafting the health message in a language that resonates with the audience.?The audience has likely been exposed to misinformation about health issues. It may hold na?ve health beliefs based on incomplete knowledge and popular opinion. The health communications professional must rely on medical facts and challenge health illiteracy. Often, strong, organized commercial or stakeholder interests may counter the health communication. In the case of HIV/AIDS, there still remain some political leaders and community constituencies who deny the existence of this disease or attribute its incidence to immoral personal choice.Nattrass, N. (2007, September). AIDS denialism vs. science. Skeptical Inquirer, 31(5). Retrieved fromhttp://www.csicop.org/si/show/aids_denialism_vs._science/___________________________________________________There are several important points you must consider to understand your target audience. The following are some of the most significant points:?The nature, incidence, and prevalence of the illness or health issue within the target audience must be understood. This is often a complex issue. Illnesses are often combined into a general category such as ?cancer? when, in fact, there are many types of cancers. Similarly, ?alcoholism? is a lay term that encompasses college student binge drinking and senior citizen over-use of alcohol with prescription medication.?Effective health education has to be targeted to a homogeneous audience to achieve an impact. Communication campaigns that attempt to address diverse audiences are too unfocused to be effective and squander resources.?Recipients of the health message have personal attributes that affect how they view illness and behavior change. Age, gender, culture, ethnicity, social relationships, and personality patterns are some examples of the heterogeneity of an audience. Selection of communication channels and messages requires planning to encompass the relevant characteristics of the intended audience and may result in different ?sub-messages? for different subgroups. These subgroups are what the social marketing field defines as ?segments.??People have different definitions of health and these definitions should be assessed as part of the audience definition. Do they consider health to be the absence of disease, a state of well-being, assurance of functioning, or physical attractiveness? Knowing these ?personal motivators? helps in crafting the health message in a language that resonates with the audience.?The audience has likely been exposed to misinformation about health issues. It may hold na?ve health beliefs based on incomplete knowledge and popular opinion. The health communications professional must rely on medical facts and challenge health illiteracy. Often, strong, organized commercial or stakeholder interests may counter the health communication. In the case of HIV/AIDS, there still remain some political leaders and community constituencies who deny the existence of this disease or attribute its incidence to immoral personal choice.Nattrass, N. (2007, September). AIDS denialism vs. science. Skeptical Inquirer, 31(5). Retrieved fromhttp://www.csicop.org/si/show/aids_denialism_vs._science/__________________________________________________!

Unlike most other websites we deliver what we promise;

  • Our Support Staff are online 24/7
  • Our Writers are available 24/7
  • Most Urgent order is delivered with 6 Hrs
  • 100% Original Assignment Plagiarism report can be sent to you upon request.

GET 15 % DISCOUNT TODAY use the discount code PAPER15 at the order form.

Type of paper Academic level Subject area
Number of pages Paper urgency Cost per page:
 Total: